Alternative Energy

As energy demands and costs continue to increase, scientists at COAPS are examining various ocean-atmospheric power options for Florida. Preliminary studies indicate that both offshore winds and ocean currents may be viable sources of renewable energy for Floridians. For more information, see the summaries below.

 
 

Offshore Wind Energy

wind farm, source: US Department of the Interior, http://www.boemre.gov/offshore/RenewableEnergy/Graphics.htmScientists at COAPS, with support from the Florida State University Institute for Energy Systems, Economics, and Sustainability, are conducting a pilot study to examine the viability of harnessing offshore wind energy to help meet Florida's growing energy demands. The scientists are examining climate data to compute the annual wind resource in Florida and its seasonal variability at selected surface wind observing stations. Preliminary results indicate that the northwestern Gulf of Mexico has the potential to generate several thousand megawatts of power for Floridians. The study will ultimately help determine whether wind is a viable renewable energy resource for Florida, and whether it is capable of supporting a new industry and the jobs and revenue that could come with it. For more information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

COAPS Offshore Wind Energy Fact Sheet (PDF)

 
 

The Florida Current

wind turbineScientists at COAPS and Florida Atlantic University's Center for Ocean Energy Technology are investigating the possibility of harnessing energy from strong ocean currents off Florida's east coast to help power Florida. The scientists are using global ocean prediction models to assess and predict power availability in the Florida Current, a section of the Gulf Stream System which extends from the Florida Straits to Cape Hatteras, and are also assessing the impact underwater ocean turbines might have on the Florida Current and Gulf Stream. So far, their research indicates that the power available in the Florida Current can range between 6 to 10 gigawatts, depending on turbine efficiency, which is equivalent to about 6 to 10 nuclear power plants. For more information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..